Radhika Timbadia

Alumnus, High Altitudes

Radhika

Radhika works in the High Altitude programme, coordinating their social enterprise initiatives.

Projects

Dsc02937

Cashmere and Kiang

Conflict between the kiang and pastoralists in Ladakh

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Gazelles on the brink

Local extinction looms large for the Tibetan gazelle

Publications

  • Book Chapter
    2016
    South Asia: India. In Snow leopards. Biodiversity of the world: conservation from genes to landscapes. Series editor: Philip J. Nyhus, Volume editors: Thomas McCarthy, David Mallon. 
    Yash Veer Bhatnagar, Vinod Bihari Mathur, Sambandam Sathyakumar, Abhishek Ghoshal, Rishi Kumar Sharma, Ajay Bijoor, R Raghunath, Radhika Timbadia, Panna Lal
    Elsevier - Academic Press, Pages 457-469, ISBN: 978-0-12-802213-9
    Download

    PDF, 4.31 MB

    India has a rich natural history record from the Himalaya spanning over a century. In this paper we provide an overview of existing knowledge on snow leopard, especially from the more recent studies. A knowledge gap analysis revealed barely 3% of its range is relatively well studied, although snow leopards occur pervasively across ca. 100,000 km2 in the Indian Himalaya. Only 37% of its range appears to be ‘good’ habitat. Based on recent density estimates and their extrapolation over the range, India is likely to support about 500 snow leopards. Threats vary regionally, but livestock grazing by migratory herders and recent developmental pressures appear to be the most serious conservation issues threatening snow leopard and other wildlife in the snow leopard range. Given the pervasive snow leopard occurrence and human pressures, the general consensus and national strategy is to formulate and implement knowledge based, participatory programmes over large landscapes.

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